Health

A vibrant economy is dependent upon a healthy populace. Healthy citizens are more productive, lead to less costly insurance premiums, miss fewer work and/or school days, and  reduce turnover in the workplace.

Health Policy Platform

Fight the chronic health conditions which prevent too many Tennesseans from participating in and contributing fully to our state’s workforce, and whose costs hurt our economy, through policies that:

  • Empower employers to promote employee health through HSA and health insurance incentives.
    • As primary funders of health insurance coverage for thousands of Tennesseans, our state’s employers are uniquely positioned to lead our working-age population toward better health.
    • Tennessee’s public policies should further empower our job-creators to incentivize their employees to control and actively manage their chronic health conditions.
  • Promote government-private sector partnerships to address chronic health conditions.
    • Achieving improved health outcomes among working-age Tennesseans is a team sport, one which requires participation, initiative and innovation by all with a stake in that outcome.
    • As two stakeholders well-positioned to create positive health outcomes, the public and private sectors can achieve more when they work together to combat working-age Tennesseans’ chronic health conditions—and our state’s public policies should promote such collaboration.
  • Enhance availability of low- or no-cost generic RXs to control chronic health conditions.
    • Prescription medicines are highly effective in controlling hypertension, diabetes, and obesity, and in promoting smoking cessation. These widely-available medications control chronic conditions far more cost-effectively than treating them acutely after they’ve turned into disease.
    • State policy should support innovative programs that increase access by working-age Tennesseans to low- or no-cost generic medications which effectively address chronic conditions.
  • Increase the number of primary care providers in Tennessee via better payment and opportunities.
    • Medical students are increasingly passing up careers as general practitioners to practice as better-compensated specialists. As a result, working-age Tennesseans get less access to primary care—the go-to source for the preventative care they need to tackle their chronic conditions.
    • State policies should improve payments and opportunities for the primary care providers on the front lines of our battle to improve working-age Tennesseans’ chronic conditions.
  • Reduce regulatory barriers to workplace-based medical facilities.
    • Some employers are investing business capital in employee health and productivity by constructing worksite facilities that provide convenient, affordable access to preventative care.
    • Tennessee should remove, and avoid erecting, regulatory barriers to worksite-based primary care, and consider incentiv employers investing in worksite-based employee health.

Further expand access to affordable health coverage for working-age Tennesseans.

  • When working-age Tennesseans can’t afford health coverage, they can seldom afford to self-finance the primary care they need to effectively control their chronic health conditions.
  • When those conditions progress into disease, they often turn to hospital emergency rooms for critical care for which they also cannot pay—but which Tennessee’s hospitals are required to provide.
  • Meanwhile, working-age Tennesseans trapped without coverage or primary care, but with chronic health conditions, often cannot work productively—or, worse, become unable to report to work at all.
  • Tennessee must consider innovative ways to leverage available federal funding in expanding health care coverage to targeted populations of Tennesseans. By providing coverage for preventative care and major medical benefits, we can improve workforce participation and productivity and save hospitals.

Policy in Action

Coalition for a Healthy TN

The Roundtable led a coalition of a wide variety of businesses who advocated for the expansion of Medicaid in Tennessee based on the positive economic impact that expansion would bring to the state.